life, or something like it

Yesterday was the first day that we officially did yard work. Not because we’re lazy bastards (I am, but Jamie’s not), but because some cosmic entity has decided that Virginia is going to have shit weather for a while and when there are days that are really nice, we’re at work. I guess it’s all part of growing up.

I spent my time weedeating in which I mentally cursed the jackasses who throw crap into our yard (though, thankfully, I have not found dirty underwear again), silently hoped that one day the City will either A) do their damn job and clean the ditch that runs parallel to one side of our fencing or B) give me, in writing, proof/acknowledgement that the ditch is our property so I can concrete that bitch. This ditch area is used for water runoff for part of the street we live on, the grating has been covered in a nice…foot-deep or so layer of muck that the City has happily ignored for the better part of the year.

So, while I weedeated, I was attacked by the gnomes that live at our house and waded through thigh-high jungle of flowers that have grown insanely fast due to where they are. I was shocked. But, on the bright side of the wild-flowers, this has kept the Fucking Ugly plant from growing back and has happily helped the roses grow at a nice pace.

I really hate that first weedeating of the year. It makes my arms hurt and I spend much of the following day hoping that I don’t have to stretch my arms all the way out.

 

Afterwards, Mom stopped by the house and gave me her Nintendo DS because she doesn’t play it and no longer wanted it. Ok, I’ll take it. Hell, it’ll give me something to do before I go into work some mornings. She only had two games (Brain Age, which tells me my brain is 72, and Mystery Case Files: Mystery of the Missing Millionheir). I have been playing Mystery Case Files and have been thoroughly enjoying myself. Sure, it’s a “kids game,” but then again, so is Pacman and Super Mario Bros. At least, with this game, I can save! Best invention for a video game ever is the save option.

Now, we own a bright red DS that comes in a neon pink carrying case. Mom told me to draw on the case to make it mine, so I’m thinking about putting Hello Cthulhu or something on it. It only seems right.

Strangely, I’ve spent at least 5 hours playing the Mystery Case Files game, and I have not noticed where time has gone, I have not gotten so pissed off I’ve given up like I do with other games, and I’m only on Chapter/Part 4! I just started this part (I was stuck on Chapter 3 for what seemed like an eternity).

Playing this game has really convinced us that we really need to buy a Gamecube and Mario Party 7 (besides staying up all night playing Mario Party with my aunt and uncle one night, sleeping for maybe two hours, and going back to play it).

 

In other “news,” we recieved Izzy’s new crate. It’s a little smaller than what we were expecting. When we requested “Medium,” we thought we were getting something around Bug and Fly’s crate size, but no. It’s a little smaller, but that’s ok. Izzy’s not going to be getting that much bigger and this new crate works really well for her. At least I’ll have a good two days before it’s coated in this weird film from accidents (she pees and rubs her paws on the door, which even after cleaning it keeps this weird filmy feel to it).

Now we have to wait on her new harness and the USB cable so we can plug Jamie’s new laptop up to the “wireless” router. For a wireless router, it sure does have a lot of damn wires to it.

We attempted to hook it up after recieving it and somehow managed to knock our soundcard into reading through the CPU only and completely ignore the speakers. We’re a little confused by it and have not made any attempt to see what we can do with our Google-Fu skills. Mainly because it’s not a top priority and it’s set up to where we can have stuff going at night and not be woken up by it. Though, this will cause a problem when the weekend hits since that’s when we watch cheesey horror films on our Insta-Watch.

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The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror, Part 2

The Finger of Halugra – Manly Wade Wellman
A gentleman is paid to chip off the finger of a carved diety because it is believed to have magical healing powers. I was confused by this story because at first it made it seem like they were in India, but no, they were hunting down a Native American statue somewhere along the Blue Ridge Parkway (at least, that’s the impression I got)

Overall, I was given the impression that this was a newer version of “The Big Toe” (but a Native American version) and was highly entertained by the main character getting squished by a stone statue. It was a decent story, thought it probably would not be popular now due to the over-active Politically Correct dialog most people have happily embraced.

The Toddler – Terry Lamsley
A woman has spent her time slaving over a meal for some jackass who has basically used her as a concubine and has holed her sister up into a collection of rooms, she mutters darkly over everything that has happened and we find…she killed the kid, cooked it, and is about to feed it to the jerk! Woo! Ha! I am highly entertained by that.

Then, a couple hundred years later, they’re renovating the castle/hall/mansion thing and the ghost of the kid decides to attach itself to the only woman in the group of renovators. Though, strangely, she is the only one who can’t see the kid. This destroys her reputation and the evil that helped kill the kid, or at least was part of the reasoning behind it, comes back and…my assumption is he does things? I’m not sure, we’re left with a quote and that’s it. I enjoyed the beginning, was ok with the remainder but didn’t care for the end.

Not Here, Not There – Stephen Gallagher
Guy drives too fast, decides he doesn’t want to die so he hits a kid, slams on his breaks and freaks out. He drives off, telling himself that it’s the mother and kid’s fault for being in the road, it’s the cleaner-truck’s fault for being in the way, and he decides to go home and play it off. His paranoia mounts, he drives faster and faster and ends with the sub/conscious decision to hit a car. It’s kind of like Sisyphus.

The Bungalow House – Thomas Ligotti
All I got from this is some guy listens to some taps about some dude’s dreams. I’m really sorry, I have been attempting to find a story (short or otherwise) of Thomas Ligotti’s that I don’t hate. His work is in a lot of anthologies we have and I just cannot find myself to like his work. To me, it’s like a simpler version of Stephen King and I can’t read Stephen King.

Cradle – Alan Brennert
A vampire figures out a way to have a kid, through taking healthy ova, “recoding” it with her own DNA and watching a surrogate help bring it to life. It was pretty fascinating to read since the story was both new ideas and old ideas mixed together to create this neat little story. It was neat, it was sad, and if I come across this author’s work again, I will definitely read it.

The Sixth Dog – Jane Rice
A veterinarian was taught to write out his problems and get rid of the paper when he was done to put his mind at ease. So he finds himself writing about appeasing his neighbor since his property was accidentally built over his neighbor’s property and he will do anything to make sure nothing takes that 3 ft of space. Over a time, 5 people up and leave for no discernible reason and his neighbor ends up with a new dog. The vet brings up the laughable notion of putting his neighbor in “Frankenstein’s shoes” before dismissing it completely. Makes one wonder what really was going on over there.

Fun story. I enjoyed it.

Scaring the Train – Terry Dowling
Two kids spend their summers playing tricks on the conductors of trains until their last scare of the summer ends up killing a kid. Years later on another continent, the two kids meet up again, somehow get convinced to do it again and this time a girl in the group dies. They take flowers down and attempt to figure out what was going on, why this happened, and one of the original two keeps finding nails at the sight of the deaths.

Eventually he figures out that the reason why they die and he doesn’t is because he has a metal plate. But then all meaning and understanding is lost by the time the story is finished. This is probably from me missing something.  It was still a fascinating story.

La Serenissma – David Sutton
Two sisters are taken to…Venice? to be shown the wonders of the world through art and such with their guardians. So one day they’re free to roam as they please, take a wrong turn and end up in a moldering building which turns out to be a hidden part of the hotel they are staying at.

I was under the impression of reading a Lovecraft story (or even a Lovecraftian story meant for one of the Mythos anthologies). As I was reading this, “Fishwives” (yes, the Ursula Vernon painting), Insmouth, and big frilly dresses came to mind. Also plague masks and a splash of Vincent Price. So it was a good story, even with the bizarre sexy-times part.

The Bars on Satan’s Jailhouse – Norman Partridge
Slick-talking gambler manages to sell his mute daughter to a cannibal and sends her to her doom (dooooooom) with a black man who has boots made of live bats. Ok then. SO we get a western horror-story.

Why, why, why do you have a character who tells his life story to these two characters when he’s a minor character?! I don’t care about the Coyote-Man. I don’t need to know his history or his love of sleeping in a hollow or if he can do a jig or shoot the tail off a coyote a 300 ft. The “white goblin” was weird with his obsession with China and having the gambler’s kid, though I did find the cannibalism part fascinating even if I did question the number of bones left on the plate. In the side-story, they make note that bones were stripped clean, but this way they make it seem like it’s only a handful of bones when there are 28 bones in one foot and considering how small some of these are, shouldn’t the guy have choked? Or something.

The conversation between a dead man and Jesus who are in actuality other dead carcasses roasting on a home-made grill were fascinating. But did the guy’s boots keep him from being roasted, toasted, and burned to a crisp? Or, at least, have enough burning going on to cause him to go into shock to where he would not get up and kill the guy who just checked to see if he was “done yet”? I didn’t care much for the end, I found I didn’t care much for the entire story and I’m glad it’s over.

 

And that’s it for what I’ve got thus far for the Mammoth Book. Now to go bake chicken since it should’ve marinated long enough and see if Jamie’s package has been delivered. I also need to write a decent review for David Morrell’s “Creepers” besides “Squee!”

The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror, Part 1

We have a number of Mammoth Books in our collection, so there is a high likelyhood they’ll be chopped into 2 or more parts. This is mainly due to the number of stories read and how fast I can read them. Though, with Best New Horror, I am sectioning it into 3 parts. Not because I’m not done with it yet (I’m not, I have 7 stories to go after “The Bone Carver”), but because I have a number of reviews for the stories written up and I want to post them before they get erased. This is because Snooch is evil.

Now, with Best New Horror, I found that I was overall disappointed with the stories I read. This is quite strange since most Mammoth books are fucking awesome and it was edited by Stephen Jones who does a great job at picking some great stories for the anthologies. I think it’s an overall disappointment since this was one of the first (or the first) Best New Horror for the Mammoth series and tastes, and styles, have changed since the mid 90s.

This anthology was published around the time where horror and most of the literary genre were not doing all that well, the death of Karl Edward Wagner was still pretty fresh in peoples minds, etc. Or, they were like me, kids who were more interested in horror films, video games, and who had the best cd/tape collection.

 

The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror
edited by: Stephen Jones
1996
Part 1
Tirkiluk – Ian R MacLeod
From what I’ve gathered, it’s a short story based on information gathering around WWI about cloud formations or something. It starts out as journal entries that are made for that type of work (or at least what I’m gathering that type of work is needed for).

Honestly, I got bored with it. Flipped through a couple pages, found a bizarre section about a zombie-like character giving birth. It didn’t hold enough attention so I skipped it to the next story.

The Most Boring Woman in the World – Christopher Fowler
First POV of a woman who gets bored with the normal life. It’s a fun, bizarre little story, more fucked up than ‘horror,’ I felt. The best quote of this story is:

“Was it get up, wash the kids and iron the breakfast, or make the dinner, fry the dog and kill the husband?”

I cracked up when I read it. It made the whole story even better.

Extinctions in Paradise – Brian Hodge
A gentleman goes practically in hiding in a South American town, away from the golden life of syndicated columnist with a dead family. So he pretty much hangs out with an old photographer and helps out the street-kids who…happen to have lycanthropy. Not as contaminated species, but as an evolutionary response for survival. Neat!

The story was pretty neat, but I could’ve done without the ending. I, personally, had no need to read about two random people meeting and having fun sexy times. Then I get the bizarre ending of the human version of cub-suckling and it blew the story completely.

Food Man – Lisa Tuttle
A young teen with anorexia nervosa manages to slip by and hide her uneaten meals under her bed. One evening, she consciously wonders what it looks like, only to have that desire make the food come to life and give her one hell of a ride. She determines that she needs to eat in order to have more sexy-times and after a while, annoys her Food Man. One night, she realizes that he just wants to be eaten, so she devours him. She finds this is more pleasurable than sex and decides she is still hungry so she goes off on a feeding rampage.

To me, this is not horror. This is one of those weird “I had a dream where I ate the world” kind of stories but it leaves off at the perfect place to make you wonder what happens next. Thankfully, it doesn’t go into avid detail of the sexual escapades of a young teenager and her re-animated food-corpse, which had me thinking of both the literary and film version of Herbert West, Reanimator. It’s a fun story, pretty fucked up.

More Tomorrow – Michael Marshall Smith
In the early stages of the interwebs, during that time before AOL met its peak or right around the time of this, we have the setting for this story. Sadly, I am at the age where a small portion of this makes absolutely no sense, so this is one of those stories that holds up true for “era/timed” stories that workshops and things frown upon. This is a story of your average computer geek who lives right on the line between normal and stereotype, whose biggest accomplishment is having a salad twice in a week and knowing more about The Internets than most people.

He decides he is going to surf through an alt.group and finds photos of his coworker, wigs out, but has no idea what to do and cannot help. Honestly, I got pretty bored about halfway through and just skimmed the remaining pages to find what happens to the coworker. But, overall, it’s a story of a guy who skims what would probably now be considered a message board.

This is a very timed peice unfortunately. Most people would have no idea what alt.whatever means. The only thing I am familiar with is alt.fashion.goth and that was years after it officially died and there were breif mentionings about it on other websites. Then again, I am not a message board/forum/chatroom kind of person. We don’t have to have special programs to download, unencrypt/zip, reconfigure, and upload to see things. If we want to see porn on the web, well, there are hundreds of easily accessible websites right at our fingertips.

In a way, it was a decent story, it just really did not hold my attention all that well. One day I’ll probably finish reading it, but I doubt that.

 

Going Under – Ramsey Campbell
I read this story a couple years ago in…Fruiting Fungi I think. It’s a weird story that, to me, makes no sense. I skipped it after reading a paragraph or two.

It’s pretty much about a guy who becomes very impatient, is consistently calling his house to remind his wife of something, becomes insanely claustrophobic and then has a complete mental collapse. I still have the feeling that I’m missing a key peice to the puzzle in this story. It was weird, it was Ramsey Campbell, and it was a lot better than the bloating zombies trying to suck face (the zombie thing is from one of his other stories and it still makes me twitch).

 

Survivor – Dave Smeds
Vietnam soldier decides he wants a unicorn tattoo. A badass unicorn tattoo, which happens to be cursed and he’s pretty much fucked for life. This is a really slow-starting story with a fascinating plot to it. I would reccommend this one to people to read because it’s just really fucked up. It was a decent story, but I didn’t care a whole lot about it.

 

The Stones – Patrick Thompson
All I gathered was that a couple decided to go on a vacation to some area to look at stones. This is insanely slow and I skipped it. If I want to read something like that, I will attempt to read The Long Lost again, which is really hard to get into and I never got past the fourth page.

 

Back of Beyond – Cherry Wilder
I have no recollection what this is. My notes simply state: “Not interested, skipped.” and even though the book is right beside me, I really do not feel compelled to look up the base idea for it.

 

A Hundred Little Witches – Steve Rasnic Tem
A guy was taught that all women are witches of something, so he has terrible relationships and people think he’s weird because he talks to himself. Well, he finds a girl who sympathizes with him and he freaks out, runs home, and gets ripped up by his own personal demons. It’s a strange little story and it was interesting. It sounds like it may have been something that could’ve been turned into a novella of sorts.

reviews

I write up film and book reviews, mainly so I can have a record of what I have read and what I thought about it. I put it up on my little rinky-dink website I’ve had forever and I’ve found myself thinking about maybe putting the reviews up here as well.

I mentioned this to Jamie the other day and he pointed out that I could post about them on both the little website and the blog because, hey, what’s the harm? Especially since the film reviews are for our records and I’ve been enjoying keeping a track of what book I’ve finished (I cannot keep a list of “Books I am reading” since that list generally falls between 5 and 30 books at a time. Last I checked, I was reading about 10. This is due to being easily distracted and getting bored or uninterested halfway through a book. I’m nearly done with 3 or 4 of them and I just can’t bring myself to finish them right now)

If anything, I could try to do reviews on here and keep the “condensed copy” elsewhere. It might be easier to post them up here since it would be like one entry per review instead of 8 per page for films and 10 or 12 per page for books.

It might help seeing as how I’ve need to write film reviews for…a rather large selection and just simply haven’t done so and I recently finished Dave Morrell’s “Creepers” and have yet to write a review for it. I need to figure out good ways to explain the book besides “Squee!” and “I didn’t care much for that part.”

I guess while I pick up the house and try to find where the house-gnomes put my wallet I can continue contemplating this. It’ll be much more productive than sitting here, thinking about it, and listening to the groundhogs attack each other in our neighbor’s yard or listening to Snooch do that weird clicking thing when he spots a bird close to the window.

fostering

Jamie and I foster for a local shelter and it’s been an interesting experience.

Our first foster-dog was a little 10 year old black pomeranian, who just happened to be the same little black pomeranian we helped catch a few months before. We had gone to our training class (dog training) and lured this poor little pom, who was half-bald from mange, into the parking area and called the police because, strangely enough, this is the only way we can get someone to pick up an animal or even respond to “there is a dog loose, pick it up.” He was taken and treated then landed on the RCACP’s website. I emailed about him, and we fostered him for two weeks. He was adopted 3 days after we took him back. He was a good dog.

Next, we had Dottie. A spazzy little Jack Russell/Beagle mix who, as it was explained to us, was adopted then returned because she “didn’t have enough beagle in her.” What the hell, really? We were going to foster a different dog, but he started showing symptoms of kennel cough and we had Firefly with us; Firefly and Dottie just really hit it off. She was a great little dog, she did drive us crazy from time to time but she is a dog and that’s what they do. She was happily adopted by someone 3 or 4 days after we took her back to the shelter.

Then we got Izzy. Little Miss Webby-toes. She was the youngest dog we had had (4 or 5 months), we’re still working on housebreaking her. She’s sweet, she drives us nuts, and, obviously we ended up being the ones to adopt her. We were asked to foster her since she had just been cleared from any possible health issues and to help train her a little since there was someone interested in adopting her. Only thing with the potential adopter was that they could not come down to meet her until the Saturday after we brought her back (4 days after her time with us).

The potential adopter did not adopt Izzy, so we went and adopted her. Firefly is attached to her and even though she drives us crazy she’s still our Webby-toes.

Next we had Ranger, a cute blue-pit who was returned because the people who adopted him were…well, stupid to put it lightly. They somehow believed that this little boy would never get bigger than, I’m guessing, 12 to 15 lbs (hahahahahaha). The other dog decided that Ranger was his…playtoy and Ranger finally stopped dealing with it, retailiated, freaked the adoptive parents out who immediately took him back. He stayed at the shelter and was under observation and we were asked to foster him.

Basically: He’s a pit. A wiggly, happy, excitable pit puppy. We fostered him, spent time doing stuff with him and found he is reactive to dogs. If this is worked with he can function great at places where other dogs can be, he’s got an amazing knack for paying attention to you if you say his name, and he was adopted by an awesome guy whose son loves him. The gentleman who adopted him requested to adopt Ranger 7 times and was denied 7 times, they had to fight to make sure Ranger got a home and he met the basic requirements Jamie and I set and Ranger loves the guy.

Now, we’re working with Leanna, a young pit girl from Planned Pethood. Anita got in touch with us asking if we could foster her since her foster mom broke her arm and was unable to continue with her work. Leanna’s a great little girl, she’s almost at that Itty Bittie Pocket Pittie height (Izzy’s pretty much our Pocket Pit). Sure, she’s got issues, but most dogs do and we’re really hoping that her being Dog Selective won’t hurt her chances of getting adopted (Firefly’s pretty much dog selective, Hobbes is excitable-reactive, Bug is always weary of new things, and Izzy is…well…Izzy).

The main thing that we have learned is that as soon as she’s in the car and that engine turns on, she will bark non-stop until you are parked and the engine is off. We’ll have to work with it and it’ll take a while. She also has gotten into the habit of howling when the others are barking. This symphony of barks, howls, moans, and groans is really cute for a few minutes after you’ve been awake for a good hour or two, but it’s not fun when they start up at 4 am (I blame all of them)

From what we understand she’ll be our foster-pup for as long as they need us to or until she gets adopted out. She’s a great dog, just really sensitive to things. We’re trying to keep up with what her other foster-mom did (completely positive, no harsh words, etc) but I admit, I’m terrible and yelled at Izzy and Leanna heard it (I am loud when I need to be).

We’ve come to the conclusion that we’re insane. Four dogs are ours and we’ll still foster, but I think it’s awesome we’re able to foster for Planned Pethood and it’s really awesome that we’ve been approved to foster pits by two separate rescue organizations. We’ll probably continue to work with the foster program as needed and hope that we’ll be able to get as much needed information to potential adopters as we can.

Like with Leanna: she perfers soft treats and was thoroughly confused by harder treats (like milkbone cookies) for days. She whacks herself in the face when she horseshoes around and wags her tail.

Or with Ranger: he really likes baths and tug toys, perferrably if they have squeakers with them.

Or Izzy-butt: She can’t “hold it” for ten minutes after eating. It’s still something we’re working on.

In a bizarre sense, fostering is kind of like that whole “try before you buy” to see if this pet is perfect for you. It’s also a great thing to do to help get an animal out and about, even if it is as little as two weeks or over a year (A-Rod was fostered by one guy well over a year by a gentleman who worked non-stop with him).

We like to help and it is really awesome. We’re getting dogs used to other dogs, seeing what they can and cannot do, getting them used to cats and other weird things like The Lone Gunmen sine some people have caged animals.

Sure, sometimes it does seem overwhelming (usually at about 5 am when the dogs have decided to go off because they have to pee and I’m in the middle of getting Jamie’s lunch together or working on giving the cats their food). But you also get that warm fuzzy feeling knowing that you’re helping. And we’re also getting an opportunity to help a great mutt-breed of a dog (pits).

 

I’m pretty sure there was a reason and I may have wandered off a bit, but y’know that’s fine; it’s all good. Overall, the main point is: foster! It’s fun! You get to play with a dog and teach them and help make their adoptableness even greater

Angrier and Angrier

As an animal lover and Roanoke resident, I will honestly say I really do not like Angels of Asissi. This is not because it is a low-cost spay/neuter clinic, not because it is located rather conveniently in Downtown, or some of the work they do.

I say some of the work.

Pulling animals from shelters and other cases is great, but they’re not the only ones. There are hundreds of shelters and rescue organizations that do this all the time, and usually without the hypocritical nonsense that comes out of here. Case in point: Today’s Blog Entry

They have gone off about how RCACP does not do anything for animals except euthanize them. Yes there is a high euthanasia rate in Roanoke because people aren’t educated about the need for spaying/neutering and a good portion are fucking moronic imbeciles who let their animals roam free.

This is not the first time they have done this. When Channel 10 (WSLS) decided to do a “10 On Your Side” piece about how Mary Marr, behaviorist for the RVSPCA doesn’t know what she’s doing and helps put a lot of animals to death, Angels was all over it.  And they’ve probably been doing stuff like this longer, I have just been trying to ignore them.

As Jamie pointed out about the WSLS news-blurb: “They want to point out that no one there knows how to do their job and just likes to kill animals.” Which is pretty much what the 15-minute “news” brief did. It also said some stupid things like: one animal was deemed “unadoptable,” yet Angels was able to pull it and adopt it out. If an animal is deemed “unadoptable,” even rescue organizations can’t take that animal.

When an animal is taken to RCACP (the pound. Every locality is required to have an Intake Center for animals), they give the animal a specified period of time before it is tested, contacts are made, space is looked into. If an animal is too sick or acting too aggressively to be safely stated it can go somewhere, there is that rather unfortunate option of euthanasia. The Roanoke Muncipality has chosen to make RCACP non-available for volunteers to work with, which is why you’ll see volunteers at the RVSPCA.

If the residents of Roanoke really want the RCACP to have volunteers able to work within the building, then we all need to get together and tell the Council Members this.

Yes, there is a group of volunteers who are trying to work updating coordinations with rescue organizations and the RCACP to help move more animals out and make the euthanasia numbers less because right now Mary is the only one capable of the coordinating and, frankly, she’s pretty overwhelmed as it is.

Angels is a good organization, but I find some of their practices to be less than wonderful.

Have you ever been in there? Sure, you can only do so much with a lobby, but that was one fucking nasty ass lobby/waiting area I had ever been in. Usually shelters, rescues, vet offices, etc bring about that airy, clean yet slightly-disinfectant smell to them. But Angels looked like it didn’t care how much gunk was tracked everywhere. It was really dirty, smelled awful, and I felt bad for the cat who was being dropped off.

They have a high turnover for spay/neuters. This is great! But, misinforming someone that their dog’s stitches are dissolvable and they have to have their vet put the dog under to remove them is fucked up (the dog was taken to Angels by the person’s now ex, the poor dog got an infection because of the stitches). Also ignoring a cat, who had just been neutered, that is covered in its own pee and then telling the owner they can’t bathe the cat for 24 hours? What the hell (the cat was owned by another person we know. the owner was appalled and described the cat as “being soaked in urine” and “the most hideous thing” they had ever seen when it came to an animal being treated or having a type of surgery)

That’s just poor practice in my opinion.

They also require you to be available 24/7 for volunteer work–at least, this is pretty much how it was worded when I checked in on it. If you have a job or you don’t drive, they give you this disgusted look and pretty much tell you if you’re not available when they want you, you can’t volunteer there.

Honestly, if you live anywhere near Franklin County’s Planned Pethood and need a low-cost spay or neuter, I highly recommend them. Or, if you live within a reasonable driving distance to Planned Pethood, I highly recommend them for spay/neuter as well as checking out all the awesome animals they have available. They’re clean, they ask if you want to put your baby in the crate they’ll be in before they go into surgery, they offer Cone of Shames if you need one, they explain in detail every single thing. They also do grooming and can trim nails if it’s needed. If you have questions they will answer them or find someone who can answer them for you.

Firefly and Bug were spayed at Planned Pethood and it cost approximately $70 (spaying, Cone of Shame, medication) and they explained the animal has to have this medication, it is not an option. They microchip (Hobbes was neutered there before we got him and he was microchipped after Charles, a great guy who works there, and I bathed him) and microchipping is like $25 (pretty standard). They want you to go see their animals and their kennel areas are amazing.

I have no idea what Angels’ kennel areas look like since apparently you need an appointment to even go see if your lost animal is in their holding.

Yes, they helped out with Trooper, but so did a lot of other people.

I really don’t like their childish prodding with a thinly veiled “They don’t do anything, only we do stuff here.”

But, like I said as I started out, this is my personal opinion as an animal lover and resident of Roanoke. On a professional level, I will be nice, I will be courteous, I will be professional, but I really don’t think they know how to be. Or at least those who do the write ups; those who are part of the team who pulls animals from shelters; those who complain, whine, and bitch; and those who support that highly biased original peice by WSLS.

Maybe this is just my naivete, but shouldn’t all rescue organizations try to work together? Isn’t everyone trying to, overall, do the same thing? Make sure every animal gets a home and the number of homeless animals goes down. Shouldn’t there be some level of respect with all rescue organizations to each other, at least enough respect to not point fingers and mindlessly accuse each other of things. Especially things that are out of someone’s control.

Speaking of WSLS: it would’ve been a lot nicer if there was more effort made to the original article, or, at least, more effort in pointing out the “Ooops, we fucked up.” Instead of a short blurb on the website we had to dig for.